Focaccia with red onion, sundried tomatoes, kalamata olives and Italian herbs | bitterbaker.com

Focaccia with red onion, sundried tomatoes, kalamata olives and Italian herbs

Here it is – the focaccia recipe that was featured on The Seattle Globalist! Seriously a recipe to die for. Or I mean, it’s next to impossible to go wrong with kalamata olives, red onion, sundried tomatoes and Italian herbs. But still. If the smell of this doesn’t make your mouth water, then you should see a nose doctor.

As crazy as it may sound, I try to make this recipe as rarely as I possibly can. And when I make it, it’s only for special occasions. Like for the live variety show (2 hours 45 minutes, hint hint) that the Globalist was hosting. It’s not because it’s a hassle to make (it’s actually super easy, just takes a bit of waiting). It’s only because I don’t like eating only bread for dinner. And when I make this bread, that’s what my dinner is. I may or may not have eaten two or three pieces even before I was ready to shoot the pictures. You can imagine how much was left by the time I was done with the photos.

Focaccia with red onion, sundried tomatoes, kalamata olives and Italian herbs | bitterbaker.com
Heaven on a plate, that’s exactly what it is.

Still, I’d encourage you to make this. If not only because everyone should have tried a really (really, really, really) good focaccia at least ones in their lives. See this recipe as an early birthday present from me!

Focaccia with red onion, sundried tomatoes, kalamata olives and Italian herbs

Total time: 2-4 days to prepare the dough. Then another 4-5 hours to let the dough rise and baking the focaccias. Makes 2 focaccias. Recipe for the dough adapted from Karen’s Kitchen Stories.

Ingredients

  • 1.25 tsp active dry yeast
  • 2 cups warm water
  • 567 g (20 oz) bread flour
  • 2.5 tsp sea salt
  • 1 tbsp olive oil

Toppings

  • 1/2 red onion
  • 50 olives
  • 2/3 cup sundried tomatoes in oil
  • 2 tbsp Italian herbs, or oregano

Focaccia with red onion, sundried tomatoes, kalamata olives and Italian herbs | bitterbaker.com
See the blistered crust? If I can do it then so can you!

Instructions
Mix some of the warm water with the active dry yeast to let it foam up and get active. Mix in the remaining water, sea salt and bread flour. Let the dough rest in the bowl for 5 minutes, then add the olive oil and mix further for about 1 minute. Put the dough in a new, lightly oiled bowl and let it rest 10 minutes. Take out the dough on an oiled surface. Stretch it out and fold it over itself from all four sides, using your hands or a scraper. Turn the dough upside down and put it back in the bowl. Let it rest 10 minutes. Repeat the stretch-and-fold method three more times, and let the dough rest in the bowl for ten minutes after each stretch-and-fold treatment. After the final stretch-and-fold (four total), cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let ferment in your fridge for 2-4 days.

Day 2 (or within four days)
I took out my dough from the fridge on the third day. When you take it out, let it first sit in room temperature for three hours. You can leave the plastic wrap on. Prepare the topping by slicing the red onion and olives in thin slices. Chop the sundried tomatoes and mix everything together with the Italian herbs.

When three hours have passed, carefully take out the dough on an oiled work bench. Stretch out the dough to a 9″x9″ square. Cut the dough in half. Spread out a third of your toppings on top of the focaccias. Fold each piece in thirds. Place the pieces on a lightly oiled parchment paper or a baking sheet, seamside down. Cover with plastic wrap and let rest 1 hour.

Focaccia with red onion, sundried tomatoes, kalamata olives and Italian herbs | bitterbaker.com
Spread out your toppings…

After one hour, carefully stretch out the focaccias. Try not to punctuate any of the air bubbles that have formed. Spread out a second third of your toppings on top of the focaccias. Fold in thirds, flip upside down and put them back on the parchment paper. Cover loosely with plastic wrap and let rest another hour.

Focaccia with red onion, sundried tomatoes, kalamata olives and Italian herbs | bitterbaker.com
…then fold the dough in thirds, like this. Place seamside down on a parchment paper.

Preheat the oven to 500°F. As quick, and as painless as you can, transfer the focaccias from the baking sheet to a greased oven tray (this is hard, I know! But as long as you do your best, you’ll be just fine, and the focaccias will turn out great). Spread the last third of your toppings on top of the focaccias. Press your fingertips down on the focaccias, to create little dents in the dough. Bake at 500°F for ten minutes, then turn down the temperature to 450F and bake another 20 minutes. If the focaccias have plenty of color, but don’t sound hollow when you knock on the bottom, flip them upside down and bake for another 5-10 minutes.

Let cool on a rack.

Focaccia with red onion, sundried tomatoes, kalamata olives and Italian herbs | bitterbaker.com
Serve with a light and fresh salad, to compensate for the focaccia’s slight greasiness..

This post has been submitted to YeastSpotting.

Share this post with your friends!

    You might also like:

    22 thoughts on “Focaccia with red onion, sundried tomatoes, kalamata olives and Italian herbs

    1. Korena

      Oh my gosh that looks good! Homemade focaccia is the absolute best – I have no qualms whatsoever about eating an entire loaf for dinner ;)

      Reply
      1. Yvonne Rogell Post author

        They really, really are the best! Haha, yeah, in my mind I don’t want to, and I don’t like it after, but when I’m eating it I feel really happy ;)

        Reply
    2. mookies

      This seems very similar to Greek bread with olives.
      Did you know that Kalamata olives are Greek olives’? Should try them with feta cheese
      and tomato, are fantastic.
      I love the addition of tomato and onion in your bread, it seems great.

      Reply
      1. Yvonne Rogell Post author

        No, I didn’t know that – I just know that they are my favorite kinds of olives :) Mm, yeah that would be an awesome combination! That will be my next focaccia project!

        Reply
    3. Kelly @ Life made Sweeter

      This focaccia looks absolutely amazing Yvonne! Love that they have sun-dried tomatoes and kalamata olives:) I love focaccia but this is one of the breads I have not yet attempted to make yet. You have inspired me to try making this soon since I agree, everyone should try a good focaccia at least once in our lives:)

      Reply
    4. Karen @ Karen's Kitchen Stories

      OMG I just baked a focaccia from that dough! I haven’t posted it yet, and mine doesn’t have all of the amazing extras on it. Your’s looks soooooo good. It reminds me of Nancy Silverton’s focaccia at Mozza. Beautiful Yvonne.

      Reply
      1. Yvonne Rogell Post author

        I LOVE that dough!! It’s my number 1 favorite of all times! Can’t wait to see yours, I’m sure a plain focaccia is going to be amazing too!

        Thank you Karen, that’s a lovely compliment!! :)

        Reply
    5. Penny

      Hello,
      I’m new to bread baking so I want to make sure I am following your recipe correctly. Bread makes me so nervous!!
      My question is, after I have cut the 9 x 9 dough square in half, added the toppings, folded and let rise for one hour…approximately what dimensions should I “carefully stretch out the focaccias”? I just want to make sure I do it correctly. It looks so yummy and I would be sooo sad if I mess it up.
      Thank you so much for your help.
      Kind regards,
      Penny

      Reply
      1. Yvonne Rogell Post author

        Hi Penny!

        I’m sure your bread is gonna turn out just great! Stretch it out so that the long side is approximately 9-12 inches long, or just long enough for you to be able to fold it in thirds again (doesn’t have to be those exact measurements). The most important thing is that you don’t stretch it out so thinly that it breaks. Let me know how it goes!

        Best,

        Yvonne

        Reply
    6. Leticia

      Looks absolutely fabulous, but I won’t have time to make the dough this time around. I can get dough from my local pizza parlor. Do you think that will work?

      Reply
      1. Yvonne Rogell Post author

        That’s a great idea! I think that will work just fine, you might need to adjust the cooking time depending on how thick the dough is, but I’m sure it will turn out great!

        Reply

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>